Vitamin B7 (Biotin) Recipe & Nutrition | Precision Nutrition's Encyclopedia of Food

Vitamin B7 (Biotin)

Vitamin B7 (Biotin)

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At a Glance

Vitamin B7, also known as biotin, plays an essential role in gluconeogenesis, leucine metabolism, energy production, and the synthesis of fats, as well as DNA replication and transcription. Whole food sources of vitamin B7 include leafy green vegetables, whole grains, salmon, avocado, tomatoes, carrots, almonds, eggs, and more.

Overview

Vitamin B7, also known as Biotin, is a water soluble vitamin. In the past biotin has gone by many names including coenzyme R and vitamin H. Vitamin B7 is actually the proper name.

Importance

Biotin has many functions in the body including:

  • Formation of four vital enzymes known as carboxylases, which are involved in gluconeogenesis, leucine metabolism, energy production, and the synthesis of fats
  • Assisting in DNA replication and transcription.

Food Sources

Biotin can be found in several foods including:

Deficiencies

Deficiency symptoms are rare in humans as intestinal bacteria produce enough biotin. However, consuming raw egg whites over a long period of time can cause biotin deficiency due to the protein avidin, which can bind up to four molecules of biotin and carry them out of the body. In this case, dermatologic symptoms occur.

If you suspect a health problem or deficiency in certain nutrients, please see your primary health care provider (doctor, naturopath, etc). They can help unravel the complexity of your physiology.

Excess/Toxicity

Vitamin B7 is not known to be toxic. Therefore, there are currently known symptoms of vitamin B7 excess/toxicity.

Recipe

For recipes rich in vitamin B7, check out any of the Encyclopedia of Food entries for food items listed above.

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At a Glance

Vitamin B7, also known as biotin, plays an essential role in gluconeogenesis, leucine metabolism, energy production, and the synthesis of fats, as well as DNA replication and transcription. Whole food sources of vitamin B7 include leafy green vegetables, whole grains, salmon, avocado, tomatoes, carrots, almonds, eggs, and more.