Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

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At a Glance

Vitamin B1, also known as thiamine, helps all of the body’s tissues, including the brain, function properly. Thiamine helps us turn food into energy, and assists in our DNA synthesis. You can find thiamine in asparagus, lettuce, mushrooms, spinach, tuna, lentils, whole grains, and more.

Overview

Vitamin B1, also known as Thiamine, is a water soluble vitamin. It plays a key role in many metabolic functions. In fact, all of the tissues of the body, including the brain, need thiamine to function properly.

Importance

Thiamine has many functions in the body including:

  • Functioning as a co-enzyme necessary for energy production from food
  • Assisting in the synthesis of DNA and RNA.

Food Sources

Thiamine can be found in several foods including:

Deficiencies

Common symptoms and resulting conditions of vitamin B1 deficiency include:

  • Burning feet
  • Weakness in extremities
  • Rapid heard rate
  • Swelling
  • Anorexia
  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Gastrointestinal distress.

However, your individual response could be different. If you suspect a health problem or deficiency in certain nutrients, please see your primary health care provider (doctor, naturopath, etc). They can help unravel the complexity of your physiology.

Excess/Toxicity

There are no known symptoms of vitamin B1 excess/toxicity.

Recipe

For recipes rich in vitamin B1, check out any of the Encyclopedia of Food entries for food items listed above.

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At a Glance

Vitamin B1, also known as thiamine, helps all of the body’s tissues, including the brain, function properly. Thiamine helps us turn food into energy, and assists in our DNA synthesis. You can find thiamine in asparagus, lettuce, mushrooms, spinach, tuna, lentils, whole grains, and more.