Inca Seeds Recipe & Nutrition | Precision Nutrition's Encyclopedia of Food

Inca Seeds

Inca Seeds

Share This:

At a Glance

Inca seeds, also known as sacha inchi nuts or inca peanuts, grow on the sacha inchi plant in the Andes Mountains of Peru. Inca seeds are nutritional gems. Just one ounce of inca seeds contains 9g of protein, 6g of fiber, and 14g of fat (most of which is in the form of Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids). They also offer a high content of tryptophan, an amino acid that can help promote a positive mood. Check your local health food store for inca seeds; once hard to find, they are becoming more common. Inca seeds can be added to salads, used in baking, added to smoothies, and more.

Overview

Inca Seeds, also known as sacha inchi nuts or inca peanuts, grow on the sacha inchi plant. These seeds are cultivated in the Andes Mountains of Peru. Though they are most often referred to as nuts, the inca peanut is actually a seed.

Identification

The inchi plant produces star shaped fruit, which contain oval dark brown seeds—the inca nut. The seeds resemble flat, compact almonds and have a delicious, mild, nutty flavor.

Nutrition Info

1oz of inca seeds contain about 170 calories, 9.0g of protein, 4.0g of carbohydrates, 6.0g of fiber, and 14.0g of fat (most of this being in the form of Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids).

Inca nuts are rich in vitamins E and A and are a good source good source of minerals such as calcium and iodine.

Inca nuts are also known for their high content of tryptophan, an amino acid that can help promote a positive mood.

Selection

While inca seeds are gaining popularity in North America, they aren’t yet available in all grocery stores. They can, however, be found in most natural food stores. Choose either raw or dry roasted varieties.

Storage

Store inca nuts in a cool, dry, dark place such as a dark container kept in the fridge.

Preparation

Once purchased, inca nuts are ready to be eaten! No special preparation needed. They are delicious added to salads, stir fries, and desserts.

Recipe: Inca Seed Pecan Maple Fudge Bites

Inca Seeds

These cookies are rich and sweet. Their subtle nutty flavor is a treat for the tastebuds!

Ingredients

Inca seeds, lightly salted
1 cup
pecans
1 cup
maple butter
1/2 cup
coconut butter
1/4 cup
water
1/2 cup

Directions

Prep Time: 10 minutes   Cook Time: 0 minutes   Yield: 12

Put all ingredients into your blender or food processor and blend until very smooth (note that you may need to scrape the sides of your blender a few times).

Once well blended, line a cookie sheet with wax paper. Using a spoon, scoop 1” balls of batter onto cookie sheet.

Place cookie sheet in freezer for 2-3 hours to set.

Keep leftovers in freezer.

Enjoy!

Free Recipe Book

Precision Nutrition’s Encyclopedia of Food expands every single month as we highlight new foods and showcase beautiful food photography. If you’d like to stay up to date, simply click this link. From there, we’ll send you a FREE copy of our recipe book. We’ll also let you know when new and delicious foods are added to the site.

Click here for the free Encyclopedia of Food recipe book.

At a Glance

Inca seeds, also known as sacha inchi nuts or inca peanuts, grow on the sacha inchi plant in the Andes Mountains of Peru. Inca seeds are nutritional gems. Just one ounce of inca seeds contains 9g of protein, 6g of fiber, and 14g of fat (most of which is in the form of Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids). They also offer a high content of tryptophan, an amino acid that can help promote a positive mood. Check your local health food store for inca seeds; once hard to find, they are becoming more common. Inca seeds can be added to salads, used in baking, added to smoothies, and more.