Green Onions Recipe & Nutrition | Precision Nutrition's Encyclopedia of Food

Green Onions

Green Onions

Share This:

At a Glance

Green onions, also called scallions, are a member of the Allium family and are related to onions, garlic, shallots, leeks, and chives. Like the other members of this family, green onions have a characteristic pungent, sulfurous bite. However, because its flavor is milder and fresher than most onions, it is often eaten raw. Green onions are extremely popular in Asian and Mexican cuisines and can be topped over soups, stir-frys, salads, salsas, or chutneys. Green onions, like most vegetables, are low in calories and are also high in vitamin K. Although milder in flavor than regular onions, we still caution against eating green onions before any activity that involves kissing or close-talking.

Overview

Also called scallions, green onions are in the Allium family and are related to onions, garlic, shallots, leeks, and chives. Like the other members of this family, green onions have a characteristic pungent, sulfurous bite, although it is milder than most onions.

Unlike onions or garlic, the majority of the green onion plant grows above ground, which is why it is mostly green in color, with a pale tip where it was submerged. Only under sunlight do green chlorophyll pigments emerge. In contrast, onions and garlic grow almost entirely underground and therefore are nearly colorless when harvested.

Green onions are extremely popular in a variety of Asian cuisines and are usually served raw as a flavorful garnish. Commonly, you will see them finely chopped and topped over miso soup, incorporated into chutneys, or sprinkled over rice or stir-frys. Green onions are also extremely popular in Mexican cuisine.

Green onions can either come from very young onions that haven’t yet formed a bulb, or they come from distinct Allium varieties that never form a bulb. Spring onions, which are sometimes used interchangeably with green onions/scallions, are onions that have just begun to form a bulb. Spring onions are mellower than mature onions but spicier than green onions.

This terminology gets very confusing because different countries will use different names. For example, in Canada and the UK, a spring onion typically refers to a green onion/scallion.

Identification

Green onions are composed of layers of long, tubular leaves that are vibrant green with a pale tip. Often, a short fringe of roots will still be attached to the tips.

Green onions have a fresh, oniony flavor that is sweeter and more mellow than raw onions, but slightly spicier than chives.

Some recipes will suggest discarding the dark green tips and only using the paler portions of the plant, but the entire plant is edible and flavorful.

Nutrition Info

Three medium-sized green onions (about 175g) have 14 calories, 0.8g of protein, 0.1g of fat, 1.8g of carbohydrates, 0.7g of fiber, and 0.8g of sugar. Green onions are a good source of vitamin K.

Selection

Green onions are widely available in most grocery stores and fruit and vegetable markets. They are usually sold in bunches.

When selecting green onions, look for bunches that appear firm, with a vibrant green color. If the leaves are excessively bent, bruised, or slimy, pass them over.

Storage

Store scallions in the crisper drawer of your fridge. There, they will remain firm for four to five days. Alternatively, you can also stand them, roots down, in a shallow glass of water. This method will keep them fresh for about a week.

Preparation

Green onions are typically eaten raw, although are rarely eaten on their own. Therefore, while they need minimal preparation, they are usually added to a recipe.

To eat, remove the top inch or two of the green leaves, as well as the very bottom of the coarse butt where the roots may still be attached. Peel off any outer layers that look dry or papery. Then, chop the remaining portion into thin rounds. Add as a finishing garnish to salads, salsas, stir-frys, soups, and nearly any other savory dish you can think of.

Recipe: GRILLED GREEN ONION & ASPARAGUS WITH TAHINI MISO SAUCE

Green Onions

This simple dish is easy to prepare but has big flavor. Lightly charred asparagus and green onion get dressed in a buttery, savory tahini-miso sauce. This makes a great summer side.

Ingredients

   
Vegetables:
green onions, coarse ends trimmed
1 bunch
asparagus, coarse ends trimmed
1 bunch
olive oil
1 tbsp
sea salt
1/4 tsp
   
  
   
Sauce:
unsalted butter
2 tbsp
onion, minced
1/2 small
tahini (sesame butter)
2 tbsp
white or red miso paste
1 tbsp

Directions

Prep Time: 10 minutes   Cook Time: 20 minutes   Yield: 4-6 servings

For the Vegetables:

Toss green onions and asparagus in olive oil and salt. Place on a grill, and cook until softened and slightly charred in spots, about 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from grill and set aside.

For the Sauce:

To make the sauce, melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, and cook until slightly caramelized, 7 to 10 minutes. Remove from heat, allow to cool slightly, and then whisk in tahini and miso paste.

Assembly:

Drizzle the sauce over grilled vegetables, and serve.

Free Recipe Book

Precision Nutrition’s Encyclopedia of Food expands every single month as we highlight new foods and showcase beautiful food photography. If you’d like to stay up to date, simply click this link. From there, we’ll send you a FREE copy of our recipe book. We’ll also let you know when new and delicious foods are added to the site.

Click here for the free Encyclopedia of Food recipe book.

At a Glance

Green onions, also called scallions, are a member of the Allium family and are related to onions, garlic, shallots, leeks, and chives. Like the other members of this family, green onions have a characteristic pungent, sulfurous bite. However, because its flavor is milder and fresher than most onions, it is often eaten raw. Green onions are extremely popular in Asian and Mexican cuisines and can be topped over soups, stir-frys, salads, salsas, or chutneys. Green onions, like most vegetables, are low in calories and are also high in vitamin K. Although milder in flavor than regular onions, we still caution against eating green onions before any activity that involves kissing or close-talking.