Eggshell Membrane: Results | Precision Nutrition
Results

So What Happened?

Following 4 weeks of supplementation, participants in the FJC+ group had a significantly greater decrease in post-exercise joint pain compared to participants in the placebo group (-16.13 ± 3.60 in the FJC+ group and –4.30 ± 2.84 in the placebo group; p=0.0171; see Figure 1).

Figure 2 illustrates changes in joint pain between groups across the 4 weeks of supplementation: main effects were found for both time (p=0.0003) and the interaction between group and time (p=0.0354).

Figure 1. Mean change in joint pain (measured with VAS) following 4 weeks of supplementation.

Participants in the FJC+ group experienced significantly larger decreases in post-exercise joint pain compared to participants in placebo group (p=0.0171). Note: absolute scores were adjusted into change scores, which were then compared between groups using a one-way analysis.

Figure 2. Post-exercise joint pain (measured with VAS) across 4 weeks of supplementation.

There was a main effect for time (p=0.0003), and an interaction between time and group (p=0.0354), indicating greater joint pain decreases in the FJC+ group (-43.4%) than the placebo group (-30.6%). Post-hoc analysis showed between group differences from week 1 to week 4 (p=0.0171). Note: higher VAS values indicate more pain.

In accordance with Figure 1, post-exercise joint pain in the FJC+ group decreased by 43.4% while the placebo group experienced a 30.6% decrease in pain over the 4 week period. Post-hoc analysis shows a mean difference between groups when comparing overall change in pain from week 1 to week 4 (p=0.0171).

Next day reports of joint pain also decreased over time (p=0.0015; see Figure 3) with next day joint pain decreasing by 46.7% in the FJC+ group (from 35.34 ± 4.33 during week 1 to 18.82 ± 4.38 during week 4) and by 40.9% in the placebo group (from 26.38 ± 4.58 during week 1 to 15.59 ± 4.01 during week 4). There were no significant differences between the groups' joint pain scores across the 4 weeks of supplementation (p=0.1971 for group and time interaction).

Figure 3. Next day joint pain (measured with VAS) across 4 weeks of supplementation.

A main effect was seen for time (p=0.0015). However, there were no significant differences between groups across the 4 weeks (p>0.05), indicating similar joint pain decreases in both the FJC+ group (-46.7%) and the placebo group (-40.9%). Note: higher VAS values indicate more pain.

Participants in both placebo and FJC+ supplementation groups did not report any side effects during the study.