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Old April 15th, 2012, 05:44 PM
hockechamp14 hockechamp14 is offline
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Inflammation response

I separated my shoulder about on April 6th, (grade I) and have been working to get it healthy again so I can try and get back to playing some rugby 7's over the summer.

I know better than to choke down NSAID's for any of the pain after the initial inflammatory response. However, I've been going through tiger-balm patches like a pack a day smoker going through nicotine patches.

Is the tiger balm patch going to inhibit the healing of my shoulder? (for what it's worth it seems to be helping in terms of healing, but I know it never hurts to try and find an opinion with more experience than me)

Thanks!

Active ingredients:
camphor 230 mg/patch
menthol 70 mg/patch
capscium extract 16 mg/patch

inactives:
aluminium glycinate, eucalyptus oil, glycerin, kaolin, menta oil, polysorbate 80, propylene glycol, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, sodium polyacrylate, polyacrylic acid solution, sorbitol solution, hydrotalcite, water

_________
Should I worry about what absorbing any of these things is doing in my body for that matter - or are most of them topical absorption agents (ala glycerol)?
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Old April 16th, 2012, 10:46 AM
hockechamp14 hockechamp14 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nadolsky View Post
Try any ice yet?

I'm not aware of any healing inhibition from tiger balm use. :)
Yeah I've been icing after doing rehab work or when I'm at home rotating it with some heat. Going to classes and living life makes icing a little more challenging though.

Thank you!
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Old April 17th, 2012, 12:52 PM
Dev Chengkalath Dev Chengkalath is offline
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I've had a few of my clients report feeling better after using Traumeel creams/gels on their various injuries, which is touted as an inflammatory response modulator (i.e. controls the inflammatory response), rather than an inhibitor (e.g. NSAIDs that aim to stop the response).

From my understanding, camphor et al are more like local pain blocks, rather than anti-inflammatory agents.
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Old April 23rd, 2012, 08:59 AM
mc- mc- is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hockechamp14 View Post
I separated my shoulder about on April 6th, (grade I) and have been working to get it healthy again so I can try and get back to playing some rugby 7's over the summer.

I know better than to choke down NSAID's for any of the pain after the initial inflammatory response. However, I've been going through tiger-balm patches like a pack a day smoker going through nicotine patches.

Is the tiger balm patch going to inhibit the healing of my shoulder? (for what it's worth it seems to be helping in terms of healing, but I know it never hurts to try and find an opinion with more experience than me)

Thanks!

Active ingredients:
camphor 230 mg/patch
menthol 70 mg/patch
capscium extract 16 mg/patch

inactives:
aluminium glycinate, eucalyptus oil, glycerin, kaolin, menta oil, polysorbate 80, propylene glycol, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, sodium polyacrylate, polyacrylic acid solution, sorbitol solution, hydrotalcite, water

_________
Should I worry about what absorbing any of these things is doing in my body for that matter - or are most of them topical absorption agents (ala glycerol)?
Tiger balm like ice is local and topical. IT's also passive. That is, you're not doing anything with your body to encourage a particular response.

If you want to get back to playing rugby, you may want to consider exploring movement again as soon as you can. Type 1 is a sprain, effectively, so there's been trauma but no tearing; inflammation yes. So part of getting the inflammation to clear is also by beginning to mobilize the area WITHOUT PAIN

if any movement hurts then it's not time, but by beginning to explore what movements you CAN make without pain, and making them - exploring odd angles as well - the better your healing will progress, as the bod gets continued signals that that joint is required, active and able. You also help align tissue in any rebuilding process by moving.

The other good thing about movement:
there's a heck of a lot more mechanoreceptive nerve responses (speed and location - movement - sensors) around a joint than there are nociceptors (noxious stimulus detectors). SO stimulating movement will help reduce your pain experience and your tiger balm requirements.

Indeed, you can amplify the effect not just by moving the affected joint, but by moving in general. Just move your body - your fingers, wrist, feet, ankles - the more movement the more stimulation the more pain will decrease.
More on this last point over in all about dynamic joint mobility

best
mc
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Old May 14th, 2012, 10:55 AM
mc- mc- is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nornthuk View Post
A friend of mine Ryan talked about http://bit.ly/Jx11a3 in word file. I had a hard time believing it too but it helps me with ladies pain so I take it.
Pain is a complex, multifactor outcome of a multitude of concurrent processes.

In your friend's case without more details one may speculate that the reduction in anti-inflammatories and the increased mobility assisted in rebuilding a lot of neural connections that improved performance.

Whether the ingredients in OPC-3 (oligomeric proanthocyanidins) contributed to this or not, who knows?

As for menstrual pain, again, flavinoids (Proanthocyanidins) suppress endothelin-1, which contricts blood flow, so that may be why you're getting help there. grape juice and aspirin (in lieu of the pine bark in opc-3) may have the same effect, as may cutting down on caffeine and chocolate and going for a brisk walk to keep catecholamines active (other falvinoid factors).

Reducing startchy carbs and upping color on one's plate also seems to have a tremendous effect here as well.

In other words, it's rare for one thing to be The Answer to complex, chronic pain. just a thought.

m.c.
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neural movement specialist, zhealth master trainer
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