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Old April 12th, 2012, 11:58 AM
Jerapah Jerapah is offline
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Question Working with someone very overweight

Hi
Im about to start working with a guy who is really pretty overweight, by most standards: 175cm tall and 183kg.

Gotta admit, Im a little overwhelmed about where to start.
Im an experienced Executive Coach, so Im confident enough working around issues like motivation and target setting.

Although Im certified with PN, Im certainly not an expert in the fields of nutrition or exercise.

A couple of things that are of interest are that 1) he has severe sleep apnaea 2) in the past he has lost 30kgs and then put more back on.
He is also a successful businessman who owns his own business, and he has a lot of "knowledge" in the fields of motivation and health (he is a bit of a Tony Robbins junkie)
Works all hours and does very little by way of exercise.

Any tips when you are working with this kind of situation ?
Im wondering if this is going to require something a bit out of the ordinary ... and whether things like hormones / genes are involved ... things that I dont really have experience with ....

Be grateful for any thoughts ...
Thank you
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Old April 12th, 2012, 06:29 PM
yorik yorik is offline
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Start with the basics: get his diet in order. If you're certified with PN, then you ARE an expert in nutrition. Start simple and build from there. Follow the habits.

Get his sleep apnea under control if it isn't already; this is a critical health issue. A CPAP machine is probably called for from his doctor if doesn't already have one. BTW I lost 4 kg just by starting on a CPAP, and my productivity improved immensely.

Get some basic movement into his life too. Have him park his car farther away from the office. Get him walking stairs as best as he can. Get him identifying all sorts of options to increase his expenditure without formal exercise.

There are all sorts of places to start and still keep it simple.
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Old April 13th, 2012, 03:38 PM
KevinGibbs KevinGibbs is offline
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I'm guessing you are looking for more right-to-the-point kind of advice than generic ones?

You already know what his problems are, so you needen't be told those again.

You know, I'm really in the same boat, albeit not as badly as you, with my mother.

Yorik had one great point there, though, which is that he needs BASIC exercise. Walking, cycling, not using elevators etc. Also, make sure he realises that he needs to have water with him at all times (to flush toxins out) and that he needs to get a lot of protein in him.

Make sure he doesn't eat candy or any other fast carbs and that he takes LOTS of omega 3 to get those peroxisomes working. Also, avoid margarines and make him eat lots of veggies.

Furthermore, as odd as this might sound, weightlifting might be a good idea, if he is able to do it. Overweight men turn fat into muscle rather fast, I believe. So if he has the time to go to the gym, go with him and make him lift some iron! (Because he sure as heck can't lift himself of the floor with push ups ).


That's my 2 cents
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Old April 16th, 2012, 05:34 PM
yorik yorik is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinGibbs View Post
...Furthermore, as odd as this might sound, weightlifting might be a good idea, if he is able to do it. ...
An often ignored fact is that overweight people do weight lifting all the time, for example, just by getting out of bed. There's a lot of muscle underneath the body fat. Imagine how much muscle you would get just by carrying an extra 50-100 lbs with you everywhere you went! Fat people do it 24/7!

That's one reason the protein needs of fat people are often hugely underestimated.
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Old April 17th, 2012, 02:40 PM
KosraeTV KosraeTV is offline
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It's been my experience in helping overweight people and personally as a guy who used to weigh 160 kilo... I can tell you that most obese people who do not work out have very strong calves and quads but weak upper bodies.

For me, now that I've lost a ton of weight my calves are still the strongest and most defined part of my body. My quads are insanely in shape but my hammy's and upperbody needed a lot of work. My core was above average and I do find that many overweight clients rank higher in the core areas then I anticipate.
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Old April 19th, 2012, 12:04 PM
yorik yorik is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KosraeTV View Post
It's been my experience in helping overweight people and personally as a guy who used to weigh 160 kilo... I can tell you that most obese people who do not work out have very strong calves and quads but weak upper bodies.

For me, now that I've lost a ton of weight my calves are still the strongest and most defined part of my body. My quads are insanely in shape but my hammy's and upperbody needed a lot of work. My core was above average and I do find that many overweight clients rank higher in the core areas then I anticipate.
Exactly my experience too. At one point my calculated lean body mass was about 215 pounds or 98 kilos. Once I started eating protein for that LBM, I started losing more of the fat that covered it. I still have a way to go.

Also, as I mentioned in another thread, obese people often have postural problems from compensating for their unusual weight distribution. For example, I leaned my weight backwards and took more of it on my heels, than on my toes. This shifts the emphasis to different muscles than a typical balanced posture. It also makes it difficult to perform exercises that assume a more forward / toe-base posture, like tai chi and salsa dancing.

Last edited by yorik; April 19th, 2012 at 12:05 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 01:57 PM
Georgie Fear 1 Georgie Fear 1 is offline
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Some general advice I can share when working with extremely obese clients: Show them respect and trear them with dignity (they may have an embarassing moment or two such as not fitting a piece of equipment or not being able to do something most people could), use very basic exercise and food guidelines, nothing crazy. Develop trust, this person may have been shamed and judged by two dozen people THAT DAY, let alone their whole lives.

Acceptance and trust will lead to solid relationship between you, and that solid relationship will lead to consistently showing up on their part, hopefully long term. This is not going to be a quick road for them. So, build a foundation of trust foremost. From then on, just find out where they are, and move a step in the right direction of doing the behaviors you want them to adopt.

Let me know if you have any other questions as you start working with this client. I'm hoping its a great learning experience for you both.
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